Instructions for presentations:

  • For one presentation I will ask you to work in groups of two; half the work, twice the fun! Use the Piazza to find a partner, or ask me and I will find someone.

  • Shoot for 15-20 minutes long with no interruptions. That’s 10 slides in most cases.

  • Your “audience” will have reviewed the paper. You don’t need to go into exhaustive detail. Hit the high points, and the most important insights.

  • Expect to be interrupted if the class wants to make a point or ask a question. That’s what we’re after.

  • Finish with analysis / your original opinion. Good paper? Important contribution? What are some open questions?

  • Then lead a discussion. Prepare several questions to pose to the class. Examples might include:
    • We didn’t understand this part - can anybody explain?
    • Can you think of serious drawbacks or limitations of this work?
    • If this is an attack, what are some defenses, and if it is a defense, what are some attacks? etc.
    • What is some additional data that should have been presented?
  • On your title slide identify the paper title, authors, and source, as well as your own names and the date.

  • I don’t mind if you incorporate figures from the paper (it’s time-consuming to draw figures), or even from someone else’s presentation, but cite the source on that slide. You should not just give someone else’s presentation - use your own ideas and words to present.

Presentation Grading Rubric

Rubric Form

Instructions for participation:

  • Read the papers being presented, before class. To understand the work, you may in some cases need to look at some of the references cited.
  • Take a few notes of your impressions while you are reading, as if you were reviewing the paper. Is the paper written well and logically? Are the findings original and important? How does it compare with other work? Are the conclusions solid and well justified? What open problems are left / open questions left unanswered?
  • Come to class ready to discuss the paper and to answer questions that are posed. Please have your Mini-review complete.

Presentation Topics and Assignments

ABCD
1
DateThemePresenterPaper
2
1/17
Measurement
AustinNDSS '17: FBS-Radar: Uncovering Fake Base Stations at Scale in the Wild
3
SathvikUsenix '13: ZMap: Fast Internet-wide Scanning and Its Security Applications
4
MattReading the Tea leaves: A Comparative Analysis of Threat Intelligence
5
6
1/24ResearchIgibekSIGCOMM '15: Encore: Lightweight Measurement of Web Censorship with Cross-Origin Requests
7
BenS&P '17: IoT Goes Nuclear: Creating a Zigbee Chain Reaction
8
Menlo Report
9
10
1/31
Fingerprinting
Ben & SathvikFaulds: A Non-Parametric Iterative Classifier for Internet-Wide OS Fingerprinting
11
Cheng ChenHow Unique is Your .onion? An Analysis of the Fingerprintability of Tor Onion Services
12
BihanUsenix 19: Wireless Attacks on Aircraft Instrument Landing Systems
13
14
2/7OpsLorenzoCCS '19: A Usability Evaluation of Let’s Encrypt and Certbot – Usable Security Done Right?
15
SaminS&P '17: The Password Reset MitM Attack
16
CCS 19: Matched and Mismatched SOCs: A Qualitative Study on Security Operations Center Issues
17
18
2/14SDNJiayang
vNIDS: Towards Elastic Security with Safe and Efficient Virtualization of Network Intrusion Detection Systems (Software Defined Networking),
19
IffatNDSS '15: SPHINX: Detecting Security Attacks in Software-Defined Networks
20
LoyCurtisDELTA: A Security Assessment Framework for Software-Defined Networks
21
22
2/21AttacksAustin & ChengUsenix 17: Beauty and the Burst: Remote Identification of Encrypted Video Streams
23
Igibek & LorenzoCCS 17: Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials
24
NDSS 18: A Large-scale Analysis of Content Modification by Open HTTP Proxies
25
26
2/28DesignBihan and SaminWhitepaper: Ethereum
27
JiaYang & LoyCurtis
WireGuard
28
Matt and IffatGoogle: BeyondCorp Design Documents