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In our lab, we are interested in identifying how cells in a multicellular organism interpret signals and make decisions, and how the decision-making process adheres to known engineering principles. The ultimate goal is to translate our knowledge to applications such as medicine, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Find out more...

Recent News

06 Nov
2017

ReevesLab is looking for one postdoc

Dr Reeves is looking for one postdoc to join the lab. The project will focus on studying the subtle changes in tissue patterning among a panel of naturally-varying fly lines. These lines have subtle genomic differences, which can be correlated to the changes in gene expression pattern. For more information, see the job posting here.

23 Oct
2017

Manuscript accepted in Development!

Our study on the mechanism of Dorsal gradient formation has recently been accepted for publication at Development. The study was led by co-first authors Sophie Carrel and Mike O'Connell, and assisted by current student Tom Jacobsen, and two former undergraduate researchers Amy Pomeroy (Allen) and Stephanie Hayes (Smith).

31 Aug
2017

ReevesLab is looking for two postdocs

Dr Reeves is looking for two postdocs to join the lab on two different projects. The first project will focus on the design of synthetic genetic network motifs in the early fruit fly embryo.

The second project will focus on studying the subtle changes in tissue patterning among a panel of naturally-varying fly lines. These lines have subtle genomic differences, which can be correlated to the changes in gene expression pattern. This job posting will open soon, so check back for details.

UPDATE: the first project has been filled, and the second project is open.

25 Aug
2017

Dr Reeves receives NIH funding with Drs Rao and Williams

Dr Reeves has received funding from the NIH to begin work on two new projects. In the first, Dr Reeves and Dr Balaji Rao will collaborate to engineer novel sensors to detect RNA and short-lifetime proteins in living tissues. They will use the new technology to study the dynamics of regulatory loops in live tissues and cells.

In the second project, Dr Reeves and Dr Cranos Williams will collaborate to study regulation of signals and decision-making in developing tissues using natural variation. The lab of Dr Trudy Mackay will contrbute fly lines and expertise to the project.

11 Aug
2017

Dr Reeves and Dr Hrischuk publish a second review paper

In the paper, Drs Reeves and Hrischuk review published "standard engineering principles" and find that the cell embodies each of these principles (save one). Additionally, they publish a novel list of Chemical Process Control Engineering Principles, and find the cell embodies these as well. The implication is there could be benefits from studying biology from an engineering point of view.

23 Sep
2016

Sophie Carrell earns PhD

Today Sophie has defended her doctoral dissertation! Sophie has published a paper on the microscopy of embryo cross sections, and has another paper on the formation of the Dorsal gradient under revision (see here). She also initiated other projects, including how the relative dosages of Dorsal and Cactus affect patterning and how the Dorsal pathway interacts with the Dpp pathway. Congratulations Dr Carrell!

19 Aug
2016

Ashley Jermusyk publishes paper on synthetic network

Former PhD student and recent graduate Ashley Jermusyk (now a postdoc at the NCI) just had her paper accepted for publication in BMC Systems Biology. She created, analyzed, and refined a synthetic negative feedback loop in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo. Read more here. Congratulations Ashley!

25 Feb
2016

Ashley Jermusyk earns PhD

Ashley has successfully defended her PhD work! In her time in my lab, she worked on several different projects, including a synthetic negative feedback loop, natural variation of gene expression patterns, and ribozyme-mediated control of gene expression. Congratulations Dr Jermusyk!

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Cells preparing to divide. Near the end of the animation, the condensed chromosomes can be seen, jiggling around.